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2017-18 CLC Research Seminar | Relational Poetics, Canadian Writings/Poétique du relationnel, Écrits du Canada

Canadian Literature Centre Research Seminar, Fall 2017

 

Relational Poetics, Canadian Writings

Poétique du relationnel, Écrits du Canada

Friday, October 27th, 2017

Senate Chamber

Old Arts Building

University of Alberta

Edmonton, AB

Organized by Dominique Hétu, postdoctoral fellow (SSHRC, CLC)

 

… my own foreignness to myself is,

paradoxically, the source of my ethical

connection with others. I am not fully known to

myself, because part of what I am is the

enigmatic traces of others.

Judith Butler

 

The idea of ethical space entertains

the possibility of a meeting place.

The space offers a venue to step out of our allegiances,

to detach from the circumscriptive limits of colonial frontier logics,

and enact a theory of human relationality

that does not require assimilation or deny indigenous subjectivity

Dwayne Donald

 

The CLC research seminar is an interdisciplinary means for stimulating discussions among emerging and established scholars, writers, and artists. It provides a local space for interactions that we hope will promote the advancement of research and critical work in Canadian literatures as well as produce lively, thought-provoking exchanges.

 

The objectives of this research seminar are:

 

  • to pay critical attention to relational encounters as spaces of care and shared vulnerability, but also – and at times simultaneously – as spaces of dispossession and harmful responses;
  • to examine how writing and reading relationality and related experiences can serve to resist persistent dichotomies and systems of cultural and political oppression;
  • to investigate creative forms/expressions of relationality as sites of ethico-political implications that undermine the myth of independence and “that challenge the very notion of ourselves as autonomous and in control” (Butler 23);
  • to question relationality as a strictly human set of affects, actions, and processes, and explore the notion of relationality with nonhuman and posthuman bodies.

 

We welcome critical approaches both in terms of cultural and creative productions or in terms of our discipline (discourses, pedagogy, CanLit, etc.). We thus invite proposals for panels, roundtables, papers, and dynamic discussions around, but not limited to, the following issues:

 

  • Care Relations and Care Work
  • Indigenous Relational Traditions and Methodologies
  • Solidarity and Intersectionality
  • The Ethicalities of Kinship/Friendship
  • Responsibility and Hospitality
  • Relationality and Race
  • Community, Citizenship, and Justice
  • Relationality and Embodiment/Corporeality/Materiality
  • Solitudes, Exclusions, and Margins
  • Relationality and Class/Poverty/Precarity
  • Relationality, the Nonhuman, the Posthuman
  • Ecology, Environment and Naturecultures
  • Queer Relationalities
  • Relationality and Diasporas
  • Global/Local Interdependencies

 

Please send proposals in English or in French (300 words) and a short bio before September 30th to Dominique Hétu at htu@ualberta.ca. Atypical forms of presentation are most welcomed.

 

The event will be followed by the CLC Scholarly Lecture, given this year by Dr. Erin Wunker, and by a reception.

 

Séminaire de recherche du Centre de Littérature Canadienne 2017

 

Poétique du relationnel, Écrits du Canada

Relational Poetics, Canadian Writings

Le vendredi 27 octobre 2017

Senate Chamber

Old Arts Building

Université de l’Alberta

Edmonton, AB

Organisé par Dominique Hétu, Boursière postdoctorale (CRSH, CLC)

 

Le séminaire de recherche du CLC vise à stimuler les discussions entre chercheur.es, artistes et écrivain.es émergent.es et établi.es. Le séminaire crée un espace propice à l’avancement de la recherche et du travail critique en littératures canadiennes, en plus de permettre des échanges aptes à susciter la réflexion.

 

Les objectifs de ce séminaire sont les suivants :

 

  • Porter une attention critique aux rencontres relationnelles en tant qu’espaces de care et de vulnérabilité partagée, mais aussi – et parfois simultanément – en tant qu’espaces de dépossession et de réponses dangereuses ;
  • Examiner comment l’écriture et la lecture de la relationnalité et de ses expériences connexes peuvent servir à résister à la persistance des binarismes et des systèmes d’exclusions politiques et culturels ;
  • Montrer les formes d’expressions de la relationnalité comme des lieux d’engagement éthico-politiques qui ébranlent le mythe de l’indépendance et qui remettent en question la notion du sujet autonome et en contrôle (Butler 23) ;
  • Questionner la relationnalité en tant qu’un ensemble d’affects, d’actions et de processus strictement humains et ainsi explorer ses possibles ancrages nonhumains et posthumains.

 

Nous sommes intéressé.es par des travaux critiques portant sur des œuvres littéraires ainsi que sur la discipline (discours, pédagogie, CanLit, etc.). Des propositions de plénières, de tables-rondes et d’autres formes de collaboration seront particulièrement les bienvenues. Elles pourront porter sur les sujets suivants, sans toutefois y être limitées :

 

  • Relations et travail de care
  • Traditions et méthodologies relationnelles autochtones
  • Solidarité et intersectionalité
  • Éthiques de l’amitié et de la parenté/filiation
  • Communauté, citoyenneté et justice
  • Responsabilité et hospitalité
  • Relationnalité et race
  • Relationnalité, corporéité, matérialité
  • Solitudes, exclusions et marges
  • Relationnalité et classe/pauvreté/précarité
  • Relationnalité, le nonhumain, le posthumain
  • Ecologie, environnement et naturecultures
  • Relationnalités queer
  • Enjeux relationnels et diasporas
  • Interdépendances globales et locales

 

Veuillez soumettre vos propositions en anglais ou en français (300 mots) ainsi qu’une courte notice biographique au plus tard le 30 septembre 2017 à Dominique Hétu (htu@ualberta.ca).

 

Le séminaire sera suivi par la Scholarly Lecture du CLC, qui sera donnée cette année par la professeure Erin Wunker. Il y aura ensuite une réception.

 

Conference: Constituting Canada

 acsanz

Constituting Canada: Interdisciplinary approaches to an idea

A conference hosted by the Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand (ACSANZ)

 

Venue:                        University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Date:                           Thursday 13th July – Friday 14th July, 2017

Keynote Speaker:      Associate Professor Eric Adams, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

 

2017 marks 150 years since the inception of the Canadian state with the British North America Act, 1867, and 35 years since 1982’s constitutional patriation, including the enactment of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. While legal acts serve as focal points for the creation (and re-creation) of the Canadian state, the connotations of Canada’s constitutive documents operate across law, politics, history, geography, society, and culture, with consequences for the past, present, and future. To engage with the manifold cultural-legal meanings that constitutions and their anniversaries evoke and contest, the Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand (ACSANZ) invites abstracts for papers that address the idea of constitutions and Canada.

The conference will ask how nations, states, and peoples in Canada have been constituted, and investigate the significance of constitutive moments in the Canadian context. Participants are invited to reflect on questions that include, but are not limited by:

  • How do constitutive documents represent, legitimate, or deny Indigenous, multicultural, gendered, and federal histories and claims?
  • How has Canada’s constitutional model and history shaped Canada, and how have these changes resonated internationally?
  • How do the arts constitute Canada and its communities? How are constitutive texts and histories reflected upon in the arts, and how are the arts shaping Canada’s legal consciousness?
  • How has the Canadian Constitution addressed its imposition upon pre-contact societies with their own legal and political orders?
  • What does the presence (or absence) of rights language in foundational documents like constitutions mean for their legal and affective power?
  • How do we remember and represent the creation of states and nations, and what does it mean to celebrate such a contested moment in time?
  • What attributes of Canada’s Constitution and its experience that have special resonance for Australia and New Zealand?
  • What possibilities does constitutional change offer for imagining and re-imagining Canada?

Contributions from across disciplines that deal with all aspects of Canada and Canadian Studies, including from a comparative perspective, are welcomed.

Please email an abstract and brief bio to Dr Robyn Morris (robynm@uow.edu.au) and Dr Benjamin Authers (benjamin.authers@canberra.edu.au) before Dec 1st, 2016. To assist with planning, earlier abstracts are welcomed and will be evaluated when they are submitted.