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Yearly Archives: 2014

Imagining Ancient Women

Imagining Ancient Women

Lyon-cover-thumb Annabel Lyon’s March 2011 lecture is now available, with Introduction by Curtis Gillespie.
Author: Annabel Lyon
Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre
Price: $10.95
ISBN: 978-0-88864-629-3
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Literature/Essay
About the book: In March 2011 the Canadian Literature Centre hosted award-winning novelist Annabel Lyon at the 5th annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. Annabel Lyon’s passion for historical novels and her love of ancient Greece make her lecture on the process of creating characters of historical fiction captivating. She discusses the process of wading through historical sources – and avoiding myriad pitfalls – to craft believable people to whom readers can relate. Finding familiarity with figures from the past and then, with the help of hindsight, discovering their secrets, are the foremost tools of the historical novel writer. Readers interested in the literary creative process and in writing or reading historical fiction will find Lyon’s comments insightful and intriguing.
About the author: Annabel Lyon, a Vancouver-based fiction writer and teacher, is the author of several books, including her acclaimed historical novel, The Golden Mean.

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Eighteen Bridges is a modern in-touch magazine concerned with people, politics, culture, and ideas, its articles substantial, in-depth, and grounded in the narrative tradition. If you are looking for back issues of Eighteen Bridges, visit HERE for a complete list of past issues.

Dear Sir, I Intend to Burn Your Book

DearSirlargeLawrence Hill’s April 2012 lecture is now available, with Introduction by Ted Bishop.
Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre
Price: $10.95
ISBN: 978-0-88864-679-8
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Canadian Literature/Essay
About the book: In 2011, Canadian writer Lawrence Hill received an email from a man in the Netherlands stating that he intended to burn The Book of Negroes, Hill’s internationally acclaimed novel. Soon, the threat was international news, affecting Hill’s publishers and readers. In this provocative essay, Hill shares his private response to that moment and the controversy that followed, examining his reaction to the threat, while attempting to come to terms with the book burner’s motives and complaints. Drawing on other instances of book banning and burning, Hill maintains that censorship is still alive and well, even in this age of access to information. All who are interested in literature, freedom of expression and human rights will appreciate this passionate defence of the freedom to read and write.