Home » nouvelles publications » Série Kreisel

Série Kreisel

2018 CLC Kreisel Lecture: Michael Crummey

The past twenty-five years have witnessed the flowering of a Newfoundland literature that has had a significant presence on the national and international stage. The place and its people have featured in the work of writers such as Annie Proulx, Wayne Johnston and Lisa Moore, all of whom have been published to acclaim in countries around the world. The emergence of a significant body of fiction in which Newfoundland’s culture and history figures prominently has done much to influence the image of Newfoundland that people from the province and in the outside world “see.” And it has also raised niggling questions about the use of history and real-life figures to animate fictional stories. Is there a limit to the liberties a writer can take with the real world? Is there a point at which a fictionalization of history becomes a falsification of history? What responsibilities do writers have to their readers, and to the historical and cultural materials they exploit as sources?

Using Newfoundland and its recent literature as a case study, and drawing on Michael Crummey’s own experience appropriating historical characters to fictional ends, “Most of What Follows is True” is an examination of the complex relationship between fact and fiction, between the “real world” and the stories we tell to explain the world to ourselves.

Date: April 12, 2018

Time: 7:30 pm

Place: The Timms Centre for the Arts (87th Avenue and 112th Street NW, University of Alberta campus)

Price: Pay What You Can

 

2016 CLC Kreisel Lecturer Margaret Atwood on CBC Radio One Ideas

CBC Atwood

“WHAT DID WE THINK WE WERE DOING…”
… we young writers of Canada?”  That’s a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton.  In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition.  Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today…or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

Friday September 16, 2016
CBC Radio One at 9:05 pm, 9:35 in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Hear it online: cbc.ca/ideas

Who Needs Books? Reading in the Digital Age

Lynn Coady’s new book, Who Needs Books, from her 2015 CLC Kreisel Lecture is available in February 2016 from the University of Alberta Press.

Who Needs Books? Reading in the Digital Age

Introduction by Paul Kennedy.

Author: Lynn Coady

Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre9781772121247

Price: $10.95

ISBN: 978-1-77212-124-7

Format: Trade paperback

Genre: Literature/Essay

About the book:“More people play games than read books. More people watch porn than read books. More people watch sports and TV and movies than read books.”

What happens if we separate the idea of “the book” from the experience it has traditionally provided? Lynn Coady challenges booklovers addicted to the physical book to confront their darkest fears about the digital world and the future of reading. Is the all-pervasive internet turning readers into web-surfing automatons and books themselves into museum pieces? The bogeyman of technological change has haunted humans ever since Plato warned about the dangers of the written word, and every generation is convinced its youth will bring about the end of civilization. In Who Needs Books?, Coady suggests that, even though digital advances have long been associated with the erosion of literacy, recent technologies have not debased our culture as much as they have simply changed the way we read.

About the author: Lynn Coady is an award-winning author and journalist whose work has
consistently drawn critical and public attention. Her first novel, Strange Heaven, was a Governor General’s Award nominee. Her subsequent books, Play the Monster Blind, Saints of Big Harbour, and Mean Boy were each recognized by the Globe and Mail as a “Best Book” in 2000, 2002, and 2006 respectively. In 2011, her novel The Antagonist was shortlisted for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize, an award she won in 2013 for her short story collection Hellgoing. Her journalism has been published in such publications as Saturday Night and Chatelaine, and Coady is also a founding editor of the Edmonton-based magazine Eighteen Bridges.

 

A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance: Imagining Multilingualism

Tomson Highway’s new book, A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance, from his 2014 CLC Kreisel Lecture is now available from the University of Alberta Press.

A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance: Imagining Multilingualism

Highway Book9781772120417_large
Introduction by Christine Sokaymoh Frederick.

Author: Tomson Highway

Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre

Price: $10.95

ISBN: 978-1-77212-041-7

Format: Trade paperback

Genre: Literature/Essay

About the book: “Fasten your chastity belts, ladies and gentlemen, it’s gonna be a bumpy ride.” From his legendary birth in a snowbank in northwestern Manitoba, through his metamorphosis to citizen-artist of the world, polyglot, playwright, pianist, storyteller, and irreverent disciple of the Trickster, Tomson Highway rides roughshod through the languages and communities that have shaped him. Cree, Dene, Latin, French, English, Spanish, and the universal language of music have opened windows and widened horizons in Highway’s life. Readers who can hang on tight—Highway fans, culture mavens, cunning linguists, and fellow tricksters—will experience the profundity of Highway’s humour, for as he says, “In Cree, you will laugh until you weep.”

About the author: Tomson Highway enjoys an international career as a playwright, novelist, and pianist/songwriter. He is considered one of this country’s  foremost Indigenous voices. He is best known for his award-winning plays, The Rez Sisters (1986), Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing (1989), Rose (2000), and Ernestine Shuswap Gets Her Trout (2005) as well as his critically-acclaimed novel, Kiss of the Fur Queen (1998). His most recent play is a one-woman musical called, “The (Post) Mistress.” Highway has won four Dora Mavor Moore Awards, a Chalmers Award, and a Wang Festival Award. In 1994, he was named a Member of the Order of Canada, the first Indigenous writer to be inducted. He holds ten honourary doctorates and has been writer-in-residence at universities across Canada. He has travelled extensively around the globe as a speaker and performer, having visited 55 countries to date.  www.tomsonhighway.com

Reviews:

http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/2015/03/tomson-highway-magic-8.html

http://www.cbc.ca/books/2015/01/a-tale-of-monstrous-extravagance.html

From Mushkegowuk to New Orleans: A Mixed Blood Highway

From Mushkegowuk to New Orleans: A Mixed Blood Highway

JosephBoydenCover-thumb Author: Joseph Boyden
Publishers: co-published by NeWest Press and the Canadian Literature Centre | Centre de littérature canadienne
Price: 9.95 CDN/US
ISBN 13: 978-1-897126-29-5
Released: March 2008
Pages: 48 pages
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Non-Fiction/Lecture
About the book: In 2007 Joseph Boyden, author of the bestselling novel Three Day Road, was invited by the Canadian Literature Centre | Centre de littérature canadienne to deliver the inaugural Henry Kreisel Lecture at the University of Alberta. Boyden spoke passionately, relating Aboriginal people in Canada to poor African Americans, Whites, and Hispanics in post-Katrina New Orleans. At the end of his lecture he presented a manifesto to the audience, demanding independence from the shackles of North American governments on behalf of these oppressed cultures. The lecture was received with much acclaim and enthusiasm.
About the author: Joseph Boyden is a member of the Ontario Woodland Métis. His first collection of stories, Born With A Tooth, was shortlisted for the Upper Canada Writers’ Craft Award and has been published in Canada and France. His debut novel, Three Day Road, is an international bestseller and has been published in thirteen languages. The first novel to be translated into Cree, it has received numerous awards in Canada and abroad, including the Roger’s Writers’ Trust Prize. Joseph splits his time between Moosonee (or James Bay Lowlands) and New Orleans. He and his wife, novelist Amanda Boyden, are both currently writers-in-residence at the University of New Orleans.

The Old Lost Land of Newfoundland: Memory, Family, Fiction, and Myth

The Old Lost Land of Newfoundland: Memory, Family, Fiction, and Myth

Johnstoncover-thumb Author: Wayne Johnston
Publishers: co-published by NeWest Press and the Canadian Literature Centre | Centre de littérature canadienne
Price: $8.95
ISBN 13: 978-1-897126-35-6
Released: March 2009
Pages: 48 pages
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Non-Fiction/Lecture
About the book: In 2008 Wayne Johnston became the second prominent Canadian writer to enlighten and entertain audiences as a speaker in the Canadian Literature Centre’s Henry Kreisel Lecture Series. He spoke to an enthusiastic audience at the University of Alberta about the myths and realities surrounding his native Newfoundland. A master storyteller, Johnston peppered the lecture with impromptu asides, delighting his listeners with true tales and well-spun yarns.
About the author: Wayne Johnston was born and raised in Goulds, Newfoundland. He obtained a BA in English from Memorial University and worked as a reporter for the St. John’s Daily News before deciding to devote himself full-time to creative writing. Since then Johnston has written seven books and has been a contributing editor for The Walrus. His first book, The Story of Bobby O’Malley, won the WH Smith/Books in Canada First Novel Award. Baltimore’s Mansion, a memoir dealing with his grandfather, his father, and himself, was tremendously well-received and won the prestigious Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction. His novels The colony of Unrequited Dreams and The Navigator of New York spent extended periods of time on bestseller lists in Canada and have been published in the US, Britain, Germany, Holland, China and Spain. Colony was also identified by The Globe and Mail as one of the 100 most important Canadian books ever produced. Johnston divides his time between Toronto and Roanoke, Virginia, where he has held the Distinguished Chair in Creative Writing at Hollins University since 2004.

Un art de vivre par temps de catastrophe

Dany Laferrière Dany Laferrière’s March 2009 lecture, I Write as I Live. Introduction and Foreword are in both French and English.
“L’interrogation n’a pas changé à 56 ans: pourquoi ne profite-t-on pas de tout ce qui nous arrive pour changer notre vie?” – Dany Laferrière
Author: Dany Laferrière
Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre | Centre de littérature canadienne
Price: $10.95
ISBN: 978-0-88864-553-1
Pages: 52 pages
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Canadian Literature/Essay
About the book: On March 5, 2009, The University of Alberta’s Canadian Literature Centre hosted award-winning author Dany Laferrière for its annual flagship Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture. The University of Alberta Press and The Canadian Literature Centre are proud to publish the French monograph that Laferrière’s presentation was based on.
About the author: Unconventional, controversial, prolific and immensely talented, Dany Laferrière was born in Haïti and adopted Québec as his new home. He achieved critical fame with his first novel, How to Make Love to a Negro Without Getting Tired. With humour and clarity, his work examines Haitian, Quebec and North American society and inter-racial relationships.

The Sasquatch at Home: Traditional Protocols & Modern Storytelling

Robinson-bookEden Robinson’s March 2010 lecture is now available, with Introduction by Paula Simons. “I was born on the same day as Edgar Allan Poe and Dolly Parton: January 19. I am absolutely certain that this affects my writing in some way.” — Eden Robinson
Author: Eden Robinson
Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press Press and the Canadian Literature Centre
Price: $10.95
ISBN: 978-0-88864-559-3
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Canadian Literature/Essay
About the book: In March 2010 the Canadian Literature Centre hosted award-winning novelist and storyteller Eden Robinson at the 4th annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. Robinson shared an intimate look into the intricacies of family, culture, and place through her talk, “The Sasquatch at Home.” Robinson’s disarming honesty and wry irony shine through her depictions of her and her mother’s trip to Graceland, the potlatch where she and her sister received their Indian names, how her parents first met in Bella Bella (Waglisla, British Columbia) and a wilderness outing where she and her father try to get a look at b’gwus, the Sasquatch. Readers of memoir, Canadian literature, Aboriginal history and culture, and fans of Robinson’s delightful, poignant, sometimes quirky tales will love The Sasquatch at Home

Imagining Ancient Women

Imagining Ancient Women

Lyon-cover-thumb Annabel Lyon’s March 2011 lecture is now available, with Introduction by Curtis Gillespie.
Author: Annabel Lyon
Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre
Price: $10.95
ISBN: 978-0-88864-629-3
Format: Trade paperback
Genre: Literature/Essay
About the book: In March 2011 the Canadian Literature Centre hosted award-winning novelist Annabel Lyon at the 5th annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. Annabel Lyon’s passion for historical novels and her love of ancient Greece make her lecture on the process of creating characters of historical fiction captivating. She discusses the process of wading through historical sources – and avoiding myriad pitfalls – to craft believable people to whom readers can relate. Finding familiarity with figures from the past and then, with the help of hindsight, discovering their secrets, are the foremost tools of the historical novel writer. Readers interested in the literary creative process and in writing or reading historical fiction will find Lyon’s comments insightful and intriguing.
About the author: Annabel Lyon, a Vancouver-based fiction writer and teacher, is the author of several books, including her acclaimed historical novel, The Golden Mean.