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Austen Lee

2020 Poetry Contest

The Canadian Literature Centre, MacEwan University, and Athabasca University are teaming up to bring you the 2020 CLC Poetry Contest! We’re looking for the best poem in English or in French from a University of Alberta, MacEwan University, or Athabasca University student on the theme “Literary Ecologies.”

Entrants should submit their poem in .doc, .docx, or .pdf format, without any identifying information in the document, to clccomm@ualberta.ca by March 13, 2020. Please include name, email address, phone number, mailing address, departmental and university affiliation in the body of the email, and use the subject line: “Last Name: CLC Poetry Contest. “

Call for Papers

In October 2018, the CLC and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology held an international conference on “The Poetics and Ethics of ‘Living With’: Indigenous, Canadian, and Québécois Feminist Production Today”, which gathered over 30 speakers in Banff, Canada. For four intense days, we discussed different representations of “living with” as a radical form of encounter, engagement, and care. In this second iteration, “The Poetics and Ethics of ‘Learning With’: Indigenous, Canadian, and Québécois Feminist Production Today,” we seek to continue thinking together about these topics, while placing an emphasis on the notion of “learning with,” which we envision as a methodological, pedagogical, as well as aesthetic position with transformative ethical consequences.

Click here to read the Call for Papers.

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne
Trondheim, Norway
August 24-25, 2020

2020 Research Seminar: Feminist Ecologies and Poetics in Canada and Quebec

With Natalie Loveless, Heather Milne, and Stephane Martelly.


The 2020 CLC Research Seminar brings together scholars to give online talks that address urgent issues relating to sustainability, ecology, feminism, and poetics. With this e-conference, we seek to respond differently and responsibly to the climate change crisis, as our own research at the Canadian Literature Centre is interested in anthropocenic, posthuman, and ecofeminist issues. The e-format also allows us to reduce our carbon footprint with a more sustainable model of academic dialogue, and we also plan to gather a live audience in Edmonton and moderate an engaging Q & A session to contribute to making this video-conference an even more engaging option for the community.


Tuesday, February 9, 2020 | 11:00 AM

Digital Scholarship Centre, 2-20 K Cameron Library

CLC Brown Bag Lunch with Marie-Celie Agnant

Join us on Thursday, February 27, 2020 for a CLC Brown Bag Lunch with celebrated novelist Marie-Célie Agnant.

Marie-Célie Agnant is a writer who has been living in Canada since 1970. She is a poet, novelist, and author of children’s book. Her work has been translated in Spanish, English, Dutch, Italian, and Korean. Her titles include The Book of EmmaSilence Like Blood (which was nominated for the 1998 Governor General’s Award), and La Dot de Sara.

Thursday, February 27, 202011:30 AM

Student Lounge, Old Arts Building

2020 Kreisel Lecture

Join us on Thursday, March 12, 2020 for the 2020 CLC Kreisel Lecture with renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer, musician and artist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, who will be delivering her original lecture titled  A Short History of the Blockade: Giant Beavers, Diplomacy & Regeneration in Nishnaabewin. The lecture will be recorded by CBC Radio One “Ideas,” and will be followed by a reception and book signing.


Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer and artist who has been widely recognized as one of the most compelling Indigenous voices of her generation. Her work breaks open the intersections between politics,  story, and song, bringing audiences into a rich and layered world of sound, light, and sovereign creativity.


Working for over a decade as an independent scholar using Nishnaabeg intellectual practices, Leanne has lectured and taught extensively at universities across Canada and has twenty years of experience with Indigenous land-based education. She holds a PhD from the University of Manitoba, and teaches at the Dechinta Centre for Research & Learning in Denendeh.  Her latest book, As We Have Always Done:  Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance  was published by the University of Minnesota Press in the fall of 2017, and was awarded Best Subsequent Book by the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.


Leanne was named the inaugural RBC Charles Taylor Emerging writer by Thomas King in 2014 and in 2017/18 she was a finalist in the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Trillium Book Award. She has published extensive fiction and poetry in both book and magazine form. Her second book of short stories and poetry, This Accident of Being Lost is a follow-up to the acclaimed Islands of Decolonial Love in Spring 2017.


Leanne is Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg and a member of Alderville First Nation.


Thursday, March 12, 2020 | 7:30 PM

Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta

INSIDE THE BAG: CAN LIT ALIVE!

inside-the-bag

Learn more about your favorite CLC authors with this digital archive of videos, photos, bibliographies , interviews, and more!

Follow this link: ABCLC.CA/INSIDETHEBAG

 

Conference: Constituting Canada

 acsanz

Constituting Canada: Interdisciplinary approaches to an idea

A conference hosted by the Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand (ACSANZ)

 

Venue:                        University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Date:                           Thursday 13th July – Friday 14th July, 2017

Keynote Speaker:      Associate Professor Eric Adams, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

 

2017 marks 150 years since the inception of the Canadian state with the British North America Act, 1867, and 35 years since 1982’s constitutional patriation, including the enactment of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. While legal acts serve as focal points for the creation (and re-creation) of the Canadian state, the connotations of Canada’s constitutive documents operate across law, politics, history, geography, society, and culture, with consequences for the past, present, and future. To engage with the manifold cultural-legal meanings that constitutions and their anniversaries evoke and contest, the Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand (ACSANZ) invites abstracts for papers that address the idea of constitutions and Canada.

The conference will ask how nations, states, and peoples in Canada have been constituted, and investigate the significance of constitutive moments in the Canadian context. Participants are invited to reflect on questions that include, but are not limited by:

  • How do constitutive documents represent, legitimate, or deny Indigenous, multicultural, gendered, and federal histories and claims?
  • How has Canada’s constitutional model and history shaped Canada, and how have these changes resonated internationally?
  • How do the arts constitute Canada and its communities? How are constitutive texts and histories reflected upon in the arts, and how are the arts shaping Canada’s legal consciousness?
  • How has the Canadian Constitution addressed its imposition upon pre-contact societies with their own legal and political orders?
  • What does the presence (or absence) of rights language in foundational documents like constitutions mean for their legal and affective power?
  • How do we remember and represent the creation of states and nations, and what does it mean to celebrate such a contested moment in time?
  • What attributes of Canada’s Constitution and its experience that have special resonance for Australia and New Zealand?
  • What possibilities does constitutional change offer for imagining and re-imagining Canada?

Contributions from across disciplines that deal with all aspects of Canada and Canadian Studies, including from a comparative perspective, are welcomed.

Please email an abstract and brief bio to Dr Robyn Morris (robynm@uow.edu.au) and Dr Benjamin Authers (benjamin.authers@canberra.edu.au) before Dec 1st, 2016. To assist with planning, earlier abstracts are welcomed and will be evaluated when they are submitted.

Ten Canadian Writers in Context

Anthology

Ten Canadian Writers in Context

Marie Carrière, Curtis Gillespie, Jason Purcell, Lynn Coady, Ying Chen, Michael Crummey, Jennifer Delisle, Kit Dobson, Caterina Edwards, Marina Endicott, Lawrence Hill, Daniel Laforest, Alice Major, Don Perkins, Julie Rodgers, Joseph Pivato, Eden Robinson,Gregory Scofield, Winfried Siemerling, Pamela Sing, Maïté Snauwaert, Kim Thúy and Angela Van Essen.

Ten years, ten authors, ten critics.

The Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne reaches into its ten-year archive of Brown Bag Lunch readings to sample some of the most diverse and powerful voices in contemporary Canadian literature.

This anthology offers readers samples from some of Canada’s most exciting writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Each selection is introduced by a brief essay, serving as a point of entry into the writer’s work. From the east coast of Newfoundland to Kitamaat territory on British Columbia’s central coast, there is a story for everyone, from everywhere. True to Canada’s multilingual and multicultural heritage, these ten writers come from diverse ethnicities and backgrounds, and work in multiple languages, including English, French, and Cree.

Ying Chen | essay by Julie Rodgers
Lynn Coady | essay by Maïté Snauwaert
Michael Crummey | essay by Jennifer Bowering Delisle
Caterina Edwards | essay by Joseph Pivato
Marina Endicott | essay by Daniel Laforest
Lawrence Hill | essay by Winfried Siemerling
Alice Major | essay by Don Perkins
Eden Robinson | essay by Kit Dobson
Gregory Scofield | essay by Angela Van Essen
Kim Thúy | essay by Pamela V. Sing

2016 CLC Kreisel Lecturer Margaret Atwood on CBC Radio One Ideas

CBC Atwood

“WHAT DID WE THINK WE WERE DOING…”
… we young writers of Canada?”  That’s a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton.  In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition.  Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today…or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

Friday September 16, 2016
CBC Radio One at 9:05 pm, 9:35 in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Hear it online: cbc.ca/ideas