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Current Events

Edmonton Poetry Festival/CLC Brown Bag Lunch Reading featuring Marilyn Dumont

This year’s joint Edmonton Poetry Festival/ CLC Brown Bag Lunch will take place on Wednesday, April, 25, 2018 at 12:00 pm (noon) and will feature acclaimed poet and U of A faculty member Marilyn Dumont. The event will take place in 2-09 Rutherford Library South.

All are welcome to this free event. Refreshments will be available.

 

CLC Celebrates New Special Issue: Affecting Feminist Literary and Cultural Production

The special issue “Affecting Feminist Literary and Cultural Production/Affects féministes dans les productions littéraires et culturelles” is now out with Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice.

Co-edited by CLC Research Affiliate Libe García Zarranz, along with Evelyne Ledoux-Beaugrand, the issue features a foreword from our very own director Marie Carrière. The special issue also includes the work of executive board member Maïté Snauwaert, along with a number of other affiliates of the centre.

“Affecting Feminist Literary and Cultural Production/Affects féministes dans les productions littéraires et culturelles” was in part inspired by a conference organized by the CLC and the Université de Montréal (and with thanks to the Trudeau Foundation), which occurred in Fall 2013: Part II of the Conference on Women’s Writing in Canada and Québec – “Affecting Women’s Writing in Canada & Québec Today.”

To view the issue, click here.

 

Upcoming 2018 CLC Conference

The next CLC international conference, “The Poetics and Ethics of ‘Living With’: Indigenous, Canadian and Québécois Feminist Production Today”/ “Les poétiques et éthiques du <<vivre avec>>: Productions féministe autochtones, canadiennes et québécoises de nos jours,” will be taking place at the Banff Centre, Alberta, from October 11-14, 2018.

Political and historical events, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Report, the Idle No More movement, Donald Trump’s immigration ban, Black Lives Matter, the ongoing refugee crises, recent controversies around cultural appropriation, environmental catastrophes, and the recurring display of systemic sexual and racial violence underline the consistent inequalities of perpetuated colonial spaces in this globalized world, as well as the often painful confrontation of different worldviews and perspectives. These are crucial concerns that have been widely discussed by Indigenous, feminist, and anti-racist theorists and cultural practitioners. The various forms of social justice intervention that have emerged in academic, public, and popular cultural spaces have further exposed the persistence of historical patterns of oppression, domination, and complicity. Explorations of the poetics and ethics of “living with” might help revisit, understand, denounce, and resist these fast and slow violences.

Des événements historiques et politiques tels que la Commission et le Rapport de la vérité et de la réconciliation du Canada, les mouvements Idle No More et Black Lives Matter, le décret anti-immigration de Donald Trump, les crises de réfugiées qui sont en cours, les récentes controverses entourant l’appropriation culturelle, les catastrophes environnementales, ainsi que la persistance systémique de la violence sexualisée et racisée soulignent les constantes inégalités perpétuées par les espaces coloniaux dans un monde globalisé, en plus des difficiles confrontations entre les différentes perspectives et visions du monde. Ce sont des préoccupations cruciales qui ont été largement discutées par des théoricien.ne.s et praticien.ne.s culturel.le.s autochtones, féministes et anti-racistes, et diverses formes d’intervention de justice sociale ont été faites dans les milieux scientifiques, publics, et culturels populaires afin d’exposer encore davantage la persistance de motifs historiques d’oppression, de domination et de complicité. Les explorations éthiques et poétiques du « vivre avec » pourraient aider à revisiter, comprendre, dénoncer et résister à ces violences lentes et accélérées.

 

To view the call for papers, click here.

2016 CLC Kreisel Lecturer Margaret Atwood on CBC Radio One Ideas

CBC Atwood

“WHAT DID WE THINK WE WERE DOING…”
… we young writers of Canada?”  That’s a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton.  In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition.  Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today…or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

Friday September 16, 2016
CBC Radio One at 9:05 pm, 9:35 in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Hear it online: cbc.ca/ideas