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New Publications

2017 CLC Kreisel Lecture | Heather O’Neill

2017 CLC Kreisel Lecture with Heather O’Neill

My Education. On unusual muses and mentors. And how I had to teach myself everything in order to cross the class divide.”

Thursday, March 9, 2017 | 7:30 PM | Timms Centre for the Arts
Pay-what-you-can | Reception & signing to follow

 

Writing Crisis

Die Krise schreiben/Writing Crisis/Écrire la crise

Edited by Ursula Mathis-Moser (Canadian Studies Centre, University of Innsbruck)

Introduction by Marie Carrière (Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne, University of Alberta)

Nicole Brossard, Louise Dupré, Aritha Van Herk, and Lee Maracle, four grandiose women and writers, reflect on our contemporary crisis and help us navigate ‘beyond’.

Nicole Brossard, Louise Dupré, Aritha Van Herk et Lee Maracle, quatre grandes femmes et admirables écrivaines, réfléchissent sur la crise contemporaine et nous éclairent le chemin de ‘l’au-delà’.

Conversations from the Crisis and Beyond: The Literatures of Canada and Quebec / Écriture de la crise : dans la torment et au-delà Les littératures au Canada et au Québec conference held at the University of Innsbruck in the fall of 2015.

writing-crisis

Ten Canadian Writers in Context

Anthology

Ten Canadian Writers in Context

Marie Carrière, Curtis Gillespie, Jason Purcell, Lynn Coady, Ying Chen, Michael Crummey, Jennifer Delisle, Kit Dobson, Caterina Edwards, Marina Endicott, Lawrence Hill, Daniel Laforest, Alice Major, Don Perkins, Julie Rodgers, Joseph Pivato, Eden Robinson,Gregory Scofield, Winfried Siemerling, Pamela Sing, Maïté Snauwaert, Kim Thúy and Angela Van Essen.

Ten years, ten authors, ten critics.

The Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne reaches into its ten-year archive of Brown Bag Lunch readings to sample some of the most diverse and powerful voices in contemporary Canadian literature.

This anthology offers readers samples from some of Canada’s most exciting writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Each selection is introduced by a brief essay, serving as a point of entry into the writer’s work. From the east coast of Newfoundland to Kitamaat territory on British Columbia’s central coast, there is a story for everyone, from everywhere. True to Canada’s multilingual and multicultural heritage, these ten writers come from diverse ethnicities and backgrounds, and work in multiple languages, including English, French, and Cree.

Ying Chen | essay by Julie Rodgers
Lynn Coady | essay by Maïté Snauwaert
Michael Crummey | essay by Jennifer Bowering Delisle
Caterina Edwards | essay by Joseph Pivato
Marina Endicott | essay by Daniel Laforest
Lawrence Hill | essay by Winfried Siemerling
Alice Major | essay by Don Perkins
Eden Robinson | essay by Kit Dobson
Gregory Scofield | essay by Angela Van Essen
Kim Thúy | essay by Pamela V. Sing

2016 CLC Kreisel Lecturer Margaret Atwood on CBC Radio One Ideas

CBC Atwood

“WHAT DID WE THINK WE WERE DOING…”
… we young writers of Canada?”  That’s a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton.  In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition.  Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today…or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

Friday September 16, 2016
CBC Radio One at 9:05 pm, 9:35 in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Hear it online: cbc.ca/ideas

Winter 2015 Issue of Eighteen Bridges

Winter 2015 Issue of Eighteen Bridges available.

 

EB-Winter2015-Cover1

We had a spectacular night for Eighteen Bridges at the National Magazine Awards on June 10, 2016.

Eighteen Bridges won three Gold medals, in Essays (Lisa Gregoire for “Breathing Holes”), Investigative Reporting (Virgil Grandfield for “The Cage”) and Society (Carissa Halton for “A Different Kind of Simakanis”),  and Silver in Best Short Feature (Alissa York for “Soft Core”).

New Eighteen Bridges podcast: Beyond the Story can be found HERE.

 

Spring 2015 Issue

Eighth issue now available!

Spring 2015 issue of Eighteen Bridges is now on sale: CLICK HERE

EB8 cover

Who Needs Books? Reading in the Digital Age

Lynn Coady’s new book, Who Needs Books, from her 2015 CLC Kreisel Lecture is available in February 2016 from the University of Alberta Press.

Who Needs Books? Reading in the Digital Age

Introduction by Paul Kennedy.

Author: Lynn Coady

Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre9781772121247

Price: $10.95

ISBN: 978-1-77212-124-7

Format: Trade paperback

Genre: Literature/Essay

About the book:“More people play games than read books. More people watch porn than read books. More people watch sports and TV and movies than read books.”

What happens if we separate the idea of “the book” from the experience it has traditionally provided? Lynn Coady challenges booklovers addicted to the physical book to confront their darkest fears about the digital world and the future of reading. Is the all-pervasive internet turning readers into web-surfing automatons and books themselves into museum pieces? The bogeyman of technological change has haunted humans ever since Plato warned about the dangers of the written word, and every generation is convinced its youth will bring about the end of civilization. In Who Needs Books?, Coady suggests that, even though digital advances have long been associated with the erosion of literacy, recent technologies have not debased our culture as much as they have simply changed the way we read.

About the author: Lynn Coady is an award-winning author and journalist whose work has
consistently drawn critical and public attention. Her first novel, Strange Heaven, was a Governor General’s Award nominee. Her subsequent books, Play the Monster Blind, Saints of Big Harbour, and Mean Boy were each recognized by the Globe and Mail as a “Best Book” in 2000, 2002, and 2006 respectively. In 2011, her novel The Antagonist was shortlisted for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize, an award she won in 2013 for her short story collection Hellgoing. Her journalism has been published in such publications as Saturday Night and Chatelaine, and Coady is also a founding editor of the Edmonton-based magazine Eighteen Bridges.

 

A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance: Imagining Multilingualism

Tomson Highway’s new book, A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance, from his 2014 CLC Kreisel Lecture is now available from the University of Alberta Press.

A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance: Imagining Multilingualism

Highway Book9781772120417_large
Introduction by Christine Sokaymoh Frederick.

Author: Tomson Highway

Publishers: co-published by the University of Alberta Press and the Canadian Literature Centre

Price: $10.95

ISBN: 978-1-77212-041-7

Format: Trade paperback

Genre: Literature/Essay

About the book: “Fasten your chastity belts, ladies and gentlemen, it’s gonna be a bumpy ride.” From his legendary birth in a snowbank in northwestern Manitoba, through his metamorphosis to citizen-artist of the world, polyglot, playwright, pianist, storyteller, and irreverent disciple of the Trickster, Tomson Highway rides roughshod through the languages and communities that have shaped him. Cree, Dene, Latin, French, English, Spanish, and the universal language of music have opened windows and widened horizons in Highway’s life. Readers who can hang on tight—Highway fans, culture mavens, cunning linguists, and fellow tricksters—will experience the profundity of Highway’s humour, for as he says, “In Cree, you will laugh until you weep.”

About the author: Tomson Highway enjoys an international career as a playwright, novelist, and pianist/songwriter. He is considered one of this country’s  foremost Indigenous voices. He is best known for his award-winning plays, The Rez Sisters (1986), Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing (1989), Rose (2000), and Ernestine Shuswap Gets Her Trout (2005) as well as his critically-acclaimed novel, Kiss of the Fur Queen (1998). His most recent play is a one-woman musical called, “The (Post) Mistress.” Highway has won four Dora Mavor Moore Awards, a Chalmers Award, and a Wang Festival Award. In 1994, he was named a Member of the Order of Canada, the first Indigenous writer to be inducted. He holds ten honourary doctorates and has been writer-in-residence at universities across Canada. He has travelled extensively around the globe as a speaker and performer, having visited 55 countries to date.  www.tomsonhighway.com

Reviews:

http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/2015/03/tomson-highway-magic-8.html

http://www.cbc.ca/books/2015/01/a-tale-of-monstrous-extravagance.html

Winter 2013 Issue

Seventh issue now available!

Winter 2013 issue of Eighteen Bridges is now on sale18-bridges-winter2013