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2019 CLC Research Seminar: Re/Placing Language

2019 CLC Research Seminar: Re/Placing LanguageSéminaire de recherche du CLC: Re/placer le langage


Join us for this year’s CLC Research Seminar, where three EFS scholars will gather to discuss their work in relation to our theme “Re/Placing Language.”  Jordan Abel (Assistant Lecturer, EFS), Matthew Cormier (Graduate Student, EFS), and Kristine Smitka (Instructor, EFS) will each deliver a paper on this theme.


Tuesday, March 19, 20193:30 – 5:30 PMSalter Reading Room (HC 3-95)All are welcome, and refreshments will be servedAbstracts:

“Unsettled Territory” 

Jordan Abel

In this short artist talk, Jordan Abel will discuss his concrete work “Cartography (12)”—a piece that was recently commissioned by the Polygon Gallery in North Vancouver that continues work that started in his second book Un/inhabited (Project Space Press/Talonbooks)—in relation to questions about land, Indigenous knowledges, and the imaginative space of poetry. 

Aca-data Linguistics: A Digital Study of Chiac in Acadian France Daigle’s Pour sûr

Matthew Cormier

In studying representations of Acadian identity in France Daigle’s Pour sûr (2011) by using digital methods and visualizations, I must consider how to engage with the novel’s treatment of Chiac, the Acadian, Francophone dialect that includes English and remnants of archaic French. Chiac’s fluidity, in both practicality and definition, makes it difficult to quantify and analyze, begging a question that, historically, troubles digital humanists and linguists alike: data or capta? Data—what is given as fact—and capta—what is taken as fact— in studies complicate the integrity of both linguistic and digital analysis. My talk will chronicle my work through the issue of “data or capta” in attempting to digitize Chiac’s representation in Daigle’s Pour sûr as an integral constituent of Acadie’s cultural fabric.

Re/Placing Tenure”

Kristine Smitka

The concept of tenure originated in the twelfth-century, where it was associated with mobility: a scholar’s right to travel throughout the Holy Roman Empire without fear of attack. My talk, “Re/Placing Tenure,” traces the etymological permutations of the word ‘tenure’ from its roots in guild culture, the precursor of modern-day unions, to its purchase within popular culture as a symbol of privileged entrenchment. This shifting term will be placed within the context of current labour conditions in Canadian—publicly-funded—universities, where more and more employees work outside of a tenure-track system. Central to the presentation will be the disambiguation of the terms academic freedom, job security, and tenure. In so doing, this talk aims to address the research seminar’s goal of addressing “language relating to place, space, or location” by opening a conversation regarding the language that frames not only academic work, but also the relational experience of colleagues who are described using different terminology.

2018 CLC Kreisel Lecture: Michael Crummey

Twelfth Annual CLC Kreisel Lecture: “Most of What Follows is True” by Michael Crummey

The past twenty-five years have witnessed the flowering of a Newfoundland literature that has had a significant presence on the national and international stage. The place and its people have featured in the work of writers such as Annie Proulx, Wayne Johnston and Lisa Moore, all of whom have been published to acclaim in countries around the world. The emergence of a significant body of fiction in which Newfoundland’s culture and history figures prominently has done much to influence the image of Newfoundland that people from the province and in the outside world “see.” And it has also raised niggling questions about the use of history and real-life figures to animate fictional stories. Is there a limit to the liberties a writer can take with the real world? Is there a point at which a fictionalization of history becomes a falsification of history? What responsibilities do writers have to their readers, and to the historical and cultural materials they exploit as sources?

Using Newfoundland and its recent literature as a case study, and drawing on Michael Crummey’s own experience appropriating historical characters to fictional ends, “Most of What Follows is True” is an examination of the complex relationship between fact and fiction, between the “real world” and the stories we tell to explain the world to ourselves.

Date: April 12, 2018

Time: 7:30 pm

Place: The Timms Centre for the Arts (87th Avenue and 112th Street NW, University of Alberta campus)

Price: Pay What You Can

 

CLC Celebrates New Special Issue: Affecting Feminist Literary and Cultural Production

The special issue “Affecting Feminist Literary and Cultural Production/Affects féministes dans les productions littéraires et culturelles” is now out with Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice.

Co-edited by CLC Research Affiliate Libe García Zarranz, along with Evelyne Ledoux-Beaugrand, the issue features a foreword from our very own director Marie Carrière. The special issue also includes the work of executive board member Maïté Snauwaert, along with a number of other affiliates of the centre.

“Affecting Feminist Literary and Cultural Production/Affects féministes dans les productions littéraires et culturelles” was in part inspired by a conference organized by the CLC and the Université de Montréal (and with thanks to the Trudeau Foundation), which occurred in Fall 2013: Part II of the Conference on Women’s Writing in Canada and Québec – “Affecting Women’s Writing in Canada & Québec Today.”

To view the issue, click here.

 

Hot off the Press: Inhabiting Memory in Canadian Literature

Inhabiting Memory in Canadian Literature / Habiter la mémoire dans la littérature canadienne

 

 

 

 

Dr. Benjamin Authers, Maïté Snauwaert & Daniel Laforest, editors

Publication date: November, 2017

Featuring seven English-language essays, five French-language essays, and a bilingual introduction, this collection examines the cultural work of space and memory in Canada and Canadian literature, and encourages readers to investigate Canada within its regional, national, and global contexts. It also invites us to recognize local intersections so easily overlooked, yet so important. The diverse critical approaches of this collection reveal and probe the unities and fractures in national understanding, telling stories of otherness and marginality, of dis-location and un-belonging. This collection will be welcomed by readers and critics of Canadian literature.

Ce livre examine l’importance culturelle de l’espace et de la mémoire en contexte canadien et plus spécifiquement dans les littératures du pays, afin d’inviter des lectures neuves des questions régionales, nationales et globales. Il rassemble sept chapitres en anglais et cinq en français, en plus d’une introduction bilingue. Les contributions, favorisant des approches thématiques et théoriques variées, sont réunies par leur désir de mettre en lumière des croisements inédits entre la mémoire et l’espace en tant qu’ils définissent certains des problèmes les plus brûlants de notre époque au Canada. S’y révèle l’équilibre fort instable entre récits unitaires et fractures communautaires, entre altérité et marginalité, ou entre dislocation et désappartenance.

Contributors/ Collaborateurs: Albert Braz, Samantha Cook, Jennifer Delisle, Lise Gaboury-Diallo, Smaro Kamboureli, Janne Korkka, André Lamontagne, Margaret Mackey, Sherry Simon, Pamela Sing, Camille van der Marel, Erin Wunker: Albert Braz, Samantha Cook, Jennifer Delisle, Lise Gaboury-Diallo, Smaro Kamboureli, Janne Korkka, André Lamontagne, Margaret Mackey, Sherry Simon, Pamela Sing, Camille van der Marel, Erin Wunker

To buy the book or to learn more, visit the University of Alberta Press here.

Fall 2017 CLC Research Seminar

Join us on Friday, October 27, 2017 for the Fall 2017 CLC Research Seminar, Relational Poetics, Canadian Writings/Poétique du relationnel, Écrits du Canada. The seminar will begin at 8:30 AM and will take place in the Senate Chamber of the Old Arts Building. To view the program, click here: CLC_ResearchSeminarF17_Program (1)

The Research Seminar will be followed by the 2017 CLC Scholarly Lecture with Erin Wunker at 4:00 PM in the Student Lounge of the Old Arts Building.